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Happy Children Learn

The Best.

 

At Morris Minors we believe that young children learn best through play-based activities and experiences that promote independent learning. We use the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) and there is now a seamless curriculum for children from birth to five years. All our staff hold at least a level 3 early years qualification and possess considerable experience necessary to play a vital role in delivering the curriculum. The high adult to child ratio also ensures children receive excellent standards of care and education.

Pre-schools, nurseries, reception classes and childminders registered to deliver the EYFS framework must follow a legal document called the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework.

 

This Document sets out:

  • The legal welfare requirements that everyone registered to look after children must follow to keep your child safe and promote their welfare

  • The seven areas of learning and development which guide professionals’ engagement with your child’s play and activities as they learn new skills and knowledge

  • Assessments that will tell you about your child’s progress through the EYFS

  • Expected levels that your child should reach at five years of age, usually the end of the reception year; these expectations are called the ‘Early Learning Goals’ (ELGs)

 

Your child will be learning skills, acquiring new knowledge and demonstrating their understanding through seven areas of learning and development. All areas of learning and development are important and inter-connected. Three areas are particularly crucial for igniting children’s curiosity and enthusiasm for learning and for building their capacity to learn, form relationships and thrive.

‘Staff are extremely creative in promoting the areas

of learning for children.  Teaching is outstanding.’

Ofsted Inspection 2017

These Prime areas are:

Communication and language

Your child will be learning skills, acquiring new knowledge and demonstrating their understanding through seven areas of learning and development. All areas of learning and development are important and inter-connected. Three areas are particularly crucial for igniting children’s curiosity and enthusiasm for learning and for building their capacity to learn, form relationships and thrive.

 
Physical Development

Children develop fine manipulative skills and hand eye co-ordination through using scissors, paint brushes, threading, sand and water. We have an outside space with various items of equipment to support physical development, such as bikes, scooters, a parachute, balls, bats and balancing equipment. We encourage children to develop muscular strength and co-ordination by throwing and catching, running, jumping and balancing. Spatial awareness is a concept that needs to be developed so that children can move safely and with confidence in their environment.

We promote the importance of physical activity and making healthy choices in relation to food. We offer a healthy snack each session and we always have drinking water available. We encourage children who bring in lunch to have a healthy meal which they are able to independently eat at the pre-school.

Children will be working towards managing their own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully, including dressing and going to the toilet. Staff are always there to support and help children as they learn these skills.

 
Personal, social and emotional development

We encourage children to have respect for themselves and others. The children should be able to play together cooperatively, sharing and taking turns. Children can work as part of a group or independently. The children are beginning to develop an understanding of right from wrong. Children are able to ask for help when needed and confident to carry out tasks independently. The children learn about rules and routine at the pre-school, thus enabling them to appreciate and value the feelings of others. Children are beginning to form positive relationships with adults and other children at the pre-school.

‘Staff expertly identify children’s learning needs and interests.  They provide children with inspirational support through planned activities and play opportunities.’

Ofsted Inspection 2017

There are four specific areas:

Literacy

Your child will be learning skills, acquiring new knowledge and demonstrating their understanding through seven areas of learning and development. All areas of learning and development are important and inter-connected. Three areas are particularly crucial for igniting children’s curiosity and enthusiasm for learning and for building their capacity to learn, form relationships and thrive.

 
Mathematics

Children develop fine manipulative skills and hand eye co-ordination through using scissors, paint brushes, threading, sand and water. We have an outside space with various items of equipment to support physical development, such as bikes, scooters, a parachute, balls, bats and balancing equipment. We encourage children to develop muscular strength and co-ordination by throwing and catching, running, jumping and balancing. Spatial awareness is a concept that needs to be developed so that children can move safely and with confidence in their environment.

We promote the importance of physical activity and making healthy choices in relation to food. We offer a healthy snack each session and we always have drinking water available. We encourage children who bring in lunch to have a healthy meal which they are able to independently eat at the pre-school.

Children will be working towards managing their own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully, including dressing and going to the toilet. Staff are always there to support and help children as they learn these skills.

 
Understanding the world

We encourage children to have respect for themselves and others. The children should be able to play together cooperatively, sharing and taking turns. Children can work as part of a group or independently. The children are beginning to develop an understanding of right from wrong. Children are able to ask for help when needed and confident to carry out tasks independently. The children learn about rules and routine at the pre-school, thus enabling them to appreciate and value the feelings of others. Children are beginning to form positive relationships with adults and other children at the pre-school.

 
Expressive arts and design

The children express their own ideas and feelings through a range of experiences and resources. We value each child as an individual and provide opportunities to discover and develop their individuality. Children are able to use their imagination through painting, music, imaginative play, construction, design and technology. They will practise techniques such as cutting and rolling, as well as experimenting with tools using play dough, clay and other malleable materials. Children’s work is displayed in the room and the end result is accepted for its worth and uniqueness.

 

This enables the children to gain confidence in the knowledge that their work is valued. Children have the opportunity to play with musical instruments and express their feelings through song and dance. Nursery rhymes and singing are part of our curriculum, enabling children to learn rhythm and language, as well as being able to participate co-operatively as a member of a group with their peers.

 
 

Nursery year at Morris Minors Pre-school:

Children can spend their nursery year at Morris Minors. The pre-school is open five full days each week and older children have the opportunity to spend a full day at our setting. Our lunchtime session is an ideal opportunity to prepare children to sit in a small group and have lunch with their friends. Full days at the pre-school enable children to understand a routine with lunchtime and play during the day. Nursery admission is completely separate from compulsory schooling and will not jeopardise your school place if you decide to keep your child at our pre-school.


All staff at Morris Minors Pre-school hold an early years qualification. We are fortunate to be able to spend quality time with each child individually, in small groups or larger groups at the pre-school. We have a dedicated nursery learning area where older children spend one-to-one time with their key person. The nursery learning area resources are designed to stimulate and encourage learning for our older children. The nursery curriculum includes the seven areas of learning but will also focus on school readiness, including promoting independence in getting dressed and managing personal hygiene.

As a pre-school and through the children’s centre, we work closely with local schools to enable children to move confidently into compulsory schooling. School transition books, together with puppets in uniforms from each local school, are used to help children become familiar with their new establishment. Reciprocal visits also take place to share valuable information and provide additional reassurance to children. Representatives from local schools and pre-schools meet regularly at the children’s centre to share information and develop best practice.

Our procedures for assessments and moderation enable staff to readily identify gaps in each individual’s learning and development.  Session activities can be planned to take account of individual and small group needs to ensure each child is best prepared for the transition to compulsory education.

‘Staff confidently assess children’s development and plan activities to accurately promote their next steps in learning.’

Ofsted Inspection 2017